Skip to Main Content
Employment

Prime Communications


More than 140 retail store employees (and counting) have lodged demands with the American Arbitration Association against Prime Communications for unpaid overtime. These employees (which include store managers, assistant store managers, and sales representatives) allege that they worked off-the-clock overtime hours without pay, and with the company’s knowledge. They seek to recover unpaid overtime compensation, double damages, and other available relief under wage and hour law.

We are pursuing these claims through a process called arbitration, which is often considered less formal than court. This is because of agreements the company had employees sign that require filing claims with the American Arbitration Association, rather than in court.

We are still accepting new claims for Prime Communications retail store employees from anywhere in the country who worked unpaid overtime hours in the past three years.

Our firm is partnered with attorneys Michael Palitz and Gregg Shavitz of Shavitz Law Group, P.A. More information about their firm and these claims can also be found at their site at https://primeovertime.com/.

 
OVERTIME CLAIM FORM

Type of Case

Unpaid Overtime

Share

Am I eligible?

You may be eligible to make a demand if you worked as a store manager, assistant store manager, and/or sales representative within the past three years and were not paid for all the overtime hours you worked (hours over 40 in a workweek). 

Additional Information

Which Locations Are Included?

Retail store employees who work or have worked for Prime Communications in any state anywhere across the country within the past three years may make a demand for unpaid overtime wages.  

How Do I Make a Claim?

In order make a demand for your unpaid overtime you must submit a Consent Form. You can sign up electronically here.

What Timeframe Does This Matter Cover?

There is a statute of limitations, which allows workers to recover unpaid overtime wages within specific time periods. Under federal law, the statute of limitation is two to three years back from when we file your demand with the American Arbitration Association.

Do I Have to Pay Anything?

We are handling these matters on a contingency fee basis. This means we will only be paid if we are successful in obtaining relief either through a settlement, award, or a final judgment, and that payment will only come out of that settlement, award, or final judgment and not your pocket.

How Do I Prove I Worked Overtime?

If you have records of the hours you worked, please preserve and keep them until we ask you for them. However, you do not need to have records of your work hours to make a claim for your overtime pay. If Prime Communications did not keep accurate time records, you are permitted to make a good-faith estimate of your work hours. We will seek any records the company may have of your hours worked as well.

What About Retaliation?

It is against the law for an employer to retaliate against a person for making a claim for unpaid wages. If you currently work for Prime Communications and you believe you may be the victim of retaliation, contact the case clerk, Bridget Peterson at (612) 256-3259 or bpeterson@nka.com immediately.

How Long Will This Take?

The length of these matters varies but can typically last one to two years.

Is There Money Available Now?

No. These matters are ongoing. There is no money currently available and there is no guarantee that you will receive money.

How Can I Help?

If you know any store managers, assistant store managers, and/or sales representatives interested in making a demand for unpaid overtime, they should contact the case clerk, Bridget Peterson at (612) 256-3259 or bpeterson@nka.com to sign up. 

How Do I Learn More?

To learn more, feel free to contact the case clerk, Bridget Peterson at (612) 256-3259 or bpeterson@nka.com.

Case Updates

  • March 4, 2022

    Retail Store Employees Launch Demands for Overtime Pay Against Prime Communications

    Over the past few weeks, more than 140 retail store employees (and counting) have lodged demands with the American Arbitration Association against Prime Communications for unpaid overtime. These employees (which include store managers, assistant store managers, and sales representatives) allege that they worked off-the-clock overtime hours without pay, and with the company’s knowledge. They seek to recover unpaid overtime compensation, double damages, and other available relief under wage and hour law.

    Michele R. Fisher, a partner at Nichols Kaster, PLLP who represents the employees, stated, “we have been learning of allegations from workers around the country that Prime Communications encouraged unpaid overtime work by instructing employees to continue working but not record time beyond scheduled hours, not paying for meal breaks not taken, and requiring off-the-clock work for meetings, conference calls, and responding to GroupMe messages. These workers should be paid for this time.” Michael Palitz, a partner with Shavitz Law Group, P.A. who also represents the store employees explained, “some companies make employees sign arbitration agreements that extinguish their right to sue in court if the employer treats them illegally and require them to bring a claim in arbitration instead. We intend to hold Prime Communications responsible by bringing these claims for these workers in arbitration.” 

    The employees are represented by Michael Palitz and Gregg Shavitz of Shavitz Law Group, P.A. and Michele Fisher and Kayla Kienzle of Nichols Kaster, PLLP.

    The firms representing the workers are still accepting new claims for Prime Communications retail store employees from anywhere in the country who worked unpaid overtime hours in the past three years. For additional information about how to make a claim, visit www.primeunpaidovertime.com or https://primeovertime.com

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established. Read full Disclaimer.